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News Release | CALPIRG | Food

Ag Subsidies Pay for 20 Twinkies per Taxpayer, But Only Half of an Apple Apiece

Sacremento, CA – Federal subsidies for commodity crops are subsidizing junk food additives like high-fructose corn syrup, at a rate that would buy 20 Twinkies for each taxpayer every year, according to CALPIRG’s new report, “Apples to Twinkies 2013.” Meanwhile, limited subsidies for fresh fruits and vegetables would buy one half of an apple per taxpayer. 
 

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Report | CALPIRG | Food

Apples to Twinkies 2013

At a time when America faces high obesity rates and tough federal budget choices, taxpayer dollars are funding the production of junk food ingredients. Since 1995, the government has spent $292.5 billion on agricultural subsidies, $19.2 billion of which have subsidized corn- and soy-derived junk food ingredients. That is enought to buy 20 twinkies for every American taxpayer.

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Media Hit | Health Care

Pay for Delay

Dr. Michael Wilkes from the University of California, Davis school of Medicine talks about pay-for-delay on his KCRW show "Second Opinion" 

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Media Hit | Health Care

Consumers are paying more money for certain drugs

The California Public Interest Research Group  released the report on  a practice critics call "Pay for delay."   That's when brand name drug companies pay off generic manufacturers to delay putting generic versions on the market.  As a result, consumers end up paying a lot more. The study found in some cases hundreds of dollars more were spent on meds used to treat cancer,  depression and heart disease. 

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Media Hit | Health Care

Pharmaceutical companies pay to delay generics

The report, from the California Public Interest Research Group and Community Catalyst, a nonprofit advocate for affordable health care, said pay-for-delay deals enable companies to continue to sell their brand-name drugs at high prices well after their original patents have expired.

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News Release | CALPIRG Education Fund | Health Care

Aetna reduces rate following CALPIRG Ed Fund's review

 This week, Aetna Life Insurance Company announced plans to reduce its proposed increase in health insurance premiums. In November, CALPIRG Education Fund completed a review of the rate hike and recommended that the California Department of Insurance declare it unreasonable. Now, 68,000 small business employees impacted by the rate hike will see a significantly smaller increase in their health insurance premiums.

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News Release | CALPIRG Education Fund

Taxpayers Bear Cost of Corporate Settlements

Can you write of your parking tickets as a tax deduction?  Of course not.  So why should coporations be able to write off fines as a business expense.  This release highlights our new report 

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News Release | CA:PIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Survey Finds Dangerous Toys on Store Shelves

“We should be able to trust that the toys we buy are safe. Unfortunately we can’t and until that’s the case, parents need to watch out for common hazards when shopping for toys.”

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News Release | CALPIRG | Financial Reform

New Survey Shows Free Checking Widely Available At Small Banks But Banks Still Hiding Fees from Consumers

San Francisco November 15– A survey of hundreds of banks and credit unions found that free checking remains available at more than 6 out of 10 small banks and credit unions but was only found at one-quarter of surveyed big banks (those with over $10 billion in deposits). The survey released today by the California Public Interest Research Group also revealed that fewer than half of branches surveyed obeyed their legal duty to fully disclose fees to prospective customers on the first request, while 12% provided no fee information at all. 

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News Release | CALPIRG | Democracy

Youth Vote Posts Strong Showing in 2012 Elections, in California and Nationally

“Despite months of hand-wringing about a supposed young voter enthusiasm gap,” said CALPIRG State Director Emily Rusch, “yesterday’s results show that young people are willing to engage in our democracy, particularly if encouraged to do so.”

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Report | The Failure of Food Companies to Disclose Risks of Genetically Engineered Crops to Shareholders

Duty to Disclose

Genetically engineered foods may pose financial risks to the food companies buying and selling genetically engineered crops, but most food companies have failed to alert their shareholders to these potential liabilities.

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Report | CALPIRG | Democracy

Tying the Hands of States

States have long been the laboratories for innovative public policy, particularly in the realm of environmental and consumer protection. State and local legislatures, smaller and often more nimble than the federal government, can develop and test novel policies to address problems identified by local constituents. If a certain policy works, other states can try it. If the policy fails, the state or local government can quickly modify the policy without having affected residents in all 50 states. Success at the state level then often gives rise to federal policy.

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Report | CALPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Mistakes Do Happen:

The most common reflection of our reputation as a trustworthy consumer is our credit report. Unfortunately, the information contained in our credit reports, which are bought and sold daily to nearly anyone who requests and pays for them, does not always tell a true story.

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Report | CALPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Policing Privacy:

This report summarizes interviews CALPIRG Education Fund held with law enforcement officers from California and other cities with high identity theft rates.

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Report | CALPIRG Education Fund | Democracy

Contribution Limits And Competitiveness

For years, academics, political theorists, and campaign finance reformers have debated the causal relationship between campaign contribution limits and the outcome of elections. Some argue that limiting campaign contributions amounts to "incumbent protection;" others contend that limits make challengers more competitive. This study is the first of its kind to comprehensively examine the states with contribution limits and empirically measure changes in competitiveness.

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